<<BACK TO MAIN-PAGE

Maca

Maca is a Peruvian root vegetable used both as food and medicine. It is sometimes called “Peruvian ginseng,” not because the plants have any botanical relationship, but because their traditional uses are somewhat similar. Traditionally, maca has been said to increase energy and stamina, and enhance both fertility and sex drive in men and women.

What is Maca Used for Today?

Maca is widely marketed for improving male sexual function , female sexual function , and both male fertility and female fertility . However, at present there is no reliable evidence that it actually provides any benefits at all.

Much of the evidence for maca comes from animal studies. In one study in rats, use of maca enhanced male sexual function. 1 Animal studies have had mixed results regarding male and female fertility. 2-7

Continue reading

CAT’S CLAW

CAT’S CLAW
HERBAL PROPERTIES AND ACTIONS

  • ■ Stimulates immune system
  • Relieves pain Vine Bark
  • Reduces inflammation
  • Kills viruses
  • Protects cells detoxifies
  • Fights free radicals
  • Cleanses blood times daily
  • Cleanses bowel
  • Increases urination
  • Kills cancer cells
  • Lowers blood pressure
  • Kill leukemia cells
  • Reduces cholesterol’
  • Tones and balances decreases depression

follow the label instructions”

Cat’s claw (U. tomentosa) is a large, woody vine that derives its name from hook-like thorns that grow along the vine and resemble the claws of a cat. Two closely related species of Uncaria are used almost interchangeably in the rainforests: U. tomentosa and U. guianensis. Both species can reach over 30 m high into the canopy. U. tomentosa has small, yellowish-white flowers, whereas U. guianensis has reddish-orange flowers and thorns that are more curved. Cat’s claw is indigenous to the Amazon rainforest and other tropical areas of South and Central America, including Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Trinidad, Venezuela, Suriname, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Panama.

There are other species of plants with a common name of cat’s claw (or uña de gato) in Mexico and Latin America however, they are entirely different plants, not belonging to the Uncaria genus, or even the Rubiaceae family. Several of the Mexican uña de gato varieties have toxic properties.
Continue reading